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  City Winery - New York
URL
Address: 155 Varick Street
City: New York
State: NY
Date Time Event Description
Nov-20-17 12:00 AM “Wines across New York State" Class & Tasting About:

Little-known fact: New York is the third largest wine-producing state in the U.S., according to the Wine Institute. There are five major wine growing regions in New York, ten official viticultural areas and more than 420 wineries operating within the state.

We invite you to join us for a class and tasting at City Winery in celebration of New York's viticultural diversity on Monday, November 20th. Named Wine Region of the Year in 2014 by Wine Enthusiast Magazine, New York produces wines that can satisfy the most discriminating wine drinker: wines that are complex, well-made and expressive of the local terroir.

During the class, we will offer twelve wines from six wineries across New York in order to highlight individual styles and expressions of the land. Our Executive Chef Michael Jeanty will prepare an assortment of hors d'oeuvres to pair with wines. We are happy to present this class with the support of the New York Wine & Grape Foundation.

Nov-20-17 12:00 AM Boy Named Banjo (Early Show) About:

Boy Named Banjo is a Americana-roots band from Nashville, TN

Barton Davies - vocals, banjo, guitar

William Reames - vocals, guitar, harmonica

Willard Logan - vocals, acoustic & electric guitar, mandolin

Sam Mccullough - Vocals, drums, Percussion

Ford Garrard - Vocals, bass

Boy Named Banjo has created a lot of buzz in the americana and country scenes east of the Mississippi. The Nashville natives founded the group in 2011, releasing their first album The Tanglewood Sessions at the age of 18. The group has since released its sophomore record, Long Story Short (2014), and an EP, Lost On Main (2015). They took the stage at Bonnaroo in 2015 which led to a nomination for "Best Local Band (Nashville)" by The Tennessean.

Boy Named Banjo is currently touring heavily, selling out shows across the eastern half of the us, and working on a new album due for 2018.

Nov-20-17 12:00 AM Marshall Crenshaw at City Vineyard About:

VOICES ON THE HUDSON

This winter, City Vineyard (233 West St in Hudson River Park) will transform into a cozy, intimate music venue where acclaimed national touring artists will perform against the gorgeous background of the Hudson River and the downtown NYC skyline. These special shows will be limited to 100 guests who will be able to enjoy thenew winter bistro menu and a full bar before, during and after the show. SEE THE FULL LINEUP HERE

 

Tickets are $20, but day of show will be $24

 

 

Over the course of a recording career that’s spanned three decades, 13 albums and hundreds of songs, Marshall Crenshaw’s musical output has maintained a consistently high level of artistry, craftsmanship and passion, endearing him to a broad and loyal fanbase. After getting an early break playing John Lennon in a touring company of the Broadway musical Beatlemania, Crenshaw began his recording career with the now-legendary indie single “Something’s Gonna Happen.” His growing notoriety in his adopted hometown of New York  City helped to win Crenshaw a deal with Warner Bros. Records, which released his self-titled 1982 debut album. That collection established Crenshaw as one of the era’s preeminent rock ’ n’ rollers, and that was confirmed by such subsequent albums as Field Day, Downtown, Mary Jean & 9 Others, Good Evening, Life’s Too Short, Miracle of Science, #447, What’s in the Bag? and Jaggedland.

Along the way, Crenshaw’s compositions have been covered by a broad array of performers, including Bette Midler, Kelly Willis, Robert Gordon, Ronnie Spector, Marti Jones and the Gin Blossoms, with whom Crenshaw co-wrote the Top 10 single “Til I Hear It From You.” He’s also provided music for several film soundtracks, appeared in the films La Bamba (in which he portrayed Buddy Holly) and Peggy Sue Got Married, and was nominated for Grammy and a Golden Globe awards for writing the title track for the film comedy Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story. Since 2011, Crenshaw has also hosted his own radio show, The Bottomless Pit, on New York’s WFUV.

 

 

 

 

 

Nov-20-17 10:00 PM Kandace Springs (Late Show) About:

KANDACE SPRINGS

Every so often a new singer emerges who’s able to assimilate multiple musical touchstones and still come off sounding remarkably fresh and unburdened by the past. Kandace Springs is one of those artists. The 27-year-old, Nashville-based singer, songwriter and pianist counts such stylists as Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, Nina Simone, Roberta Flack and Norah Jones as her heroes, but as evidenced by her sparkling full-length Blue Note Records debut, Soul Eyes, Springs mimics none of them.

Instead Springs allows her comely alto to become a conduit that touches upon soul, jazz and pop while transforming those aforementioned influences into a personalized sound that reveals itself effortlessly. “The artists who have inspired me the most all sang so naturally,” Springs says. “That helped me find my own sound.”

Springs’ journey to discovering her uniqueness didn’t happen overnight. In fact, her 2014 self-titled debut EP had a decidedly contemporary R&B/hip-hop bent with production by Pop & Oak (Rihanna, Nicki Minaj, Miguel). The EP was incredibly well-received and led to TV performances on Late Show With David Letterman, Jimmy Kimmel Live and The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, as well as appearances at the Afropunk and Bonnaroo festivals.

As amazing an experience as that was, as Springs got ready to record her album she couldn’t shake the feeling that she wasn’t yet singing her true self. Conversations with her longtime producers Carl Sturken and Evan Rogers led to soul searching and rethinking her musical direction. Eventually Springs returned to a more spacious, organic sound that channels her earlier jazz influences as well as her Nashville upbringing.

Also during this period, Springs attracted the attention of Prince, who heard her makeover of Sam Smith’s “Stay With Me” on the website Okayplayer. The music icon invited her to perform with him at Paisley Park for the 30th anniversary of Purple Rain. “He encouraged me a lot before I recorded this new record, especially during the time in which I was trying to figure out my sound,” Springs says. “He told me that I needed to do what comes naturally to me. He was absolutely right.”

For Soul Eyes, Springs continued working closely with Rogers and Sturken, but they also recruited Grammy- winning producer Larry Klein (Lizz Wright, Melody Gardot, Joni Mitchell, Herbie Hancock) to help the singer bring out her distinctive artistic traits. “Larry wanted me to be free in the studio,” Springs recalls. “I’ve been through a lot of other sessions in which the producer tries to take control of your sound. Larry was just like, ‘Go in and play what you feel.’ That ultimately led to the best outcome; he captured this record perfectly.”

Klein praises Springs as a “natural.” “In this era, in which flash and hunger for fame is often equated with talent, she’s that rare person who sings and plays because that is what she needs to do in life,” he says. “When I first heard Kandace, I was sold after hearing one song. Her smoky voice coupled with a sense of phrasing way beyond her years, and her angular way of accompanying herself on piano grabbed me right away.”

The eleven songs contained on Soul Eyes all feature Springs playing piano alongside an illustrious cast of musicians that includes trumpeter Terence Blanchard, guitarists Dean Parks and Jesse Harris, drummer Vinnie Colaiuta, organist Pete Kuzma, bassist Dan Lutz, percussionist Pete Korpela.

Through much of Soul Eyes, Springs sings about romantic affairs of the heart, starting off with the effervescent, country-laden “Talk to Me,” penned by Harris, who also wrote the gentle, life-affirming “Neither Old Nor Young.” The ruminative “Place to Hide” is a song by Judie Tzuke that Rogers has kept in the back of his mind for some time just waiting for the perfect singer to deliver it. “Every time I play that song, the room goes silent,” Springs says.

It was Sturken who introduced Springs to Mal Waldron’s signature jazz classic, “Soul Eyes.” “When I first heard it, it blew my mind,” she enthuses. “That song means so much to me.” Klein suggested the mesmerizing makeovers of two Shelby Lynne songs (“Thought It Would Be Easier” and “Leavin’”) as well as War’s haunting funk classic, “The World Is a Ghetto.”

Springs co-wrote the melancholy ballad, “Fall Guy” with Rogers and Sturken, as well as the searching, observational mid-tempo gem “Novocaine Heart.” She co-wrote the smoldering, cinematic slow-burner “Too Good To Last”—which features a soaring trumpet solo by Blanchard—with celebrated songwriters Greg Wells and Lindy Robbins. Springs composed the gorgeous solo album closer “Rain Falling” by herself. Featuring just voice and piano, the song dates back more than a decade ago to Springs’ late-teens.

“This new record is just right where it should be,” attests Springs, who draws much of her inspiration from her father, Scat Springs, a respected session singer in Nashville. It was due to him that Springs grew up surrounded by music, and he encouraged her to take piano lessons after he watched her peck out melodies on the instrument when she was 10. Yet as a girl, she was equally interested in other creative outlets, especially visual art and, more unexpectedly, automobiles. “My dad gave me a Matchbox car, a Thunderbird or something like that, and my mom gave me a Barbie,” she says. “I drew a mustache on the Barbie and never played with it again, and I still have the Matchbox car.” (Her obsession with cars, which she collects, rebuilds, and resells, continues to this day.)

It wasn’t until later that a friend of her father’s sparked something deeper in the young musician by giving her Norah Jones’ 2002 Blue Note debut, Come Away With Me. “The last song on the record is ‘The Nearness of You’ and that song really inspired me to learn to play the piano and sing. It was just so soulful, simple and stripped down. That really moved me and touched me. It’s when I realized, ‘This is what I wanna do.’” 

Springs did her own arrangement of “The Nearness of You” and performed it at a music camp in Nashville, which led to her gaining more professional gig experience in the city. An early demo Springs recorded caught the ears of Rogers and Sturken, who have written hits for the likes of Shakira, Christina Aguilera, and Kelly Clarkson, and are best known for discovering and signing Rihanna as a teenager. Rogers flew down to Nashville with an offer to sign Springs to their production company SRP. Still only 17 years old at the time, she and her family decided that it wasn’t the right time to pursue a recording career, instead taking a job at a downtown Nashville hotel where she valet parked cars by day and sang and played piano in the lounge at night.

A few years later, Springs was talking about going to automotive design school, but her mother suggested that she get back in touch with Rogers and Sturken. She instead moved to New York and started working seriously on new songs and demo recordings. She eventually landed an audition with Blue Note President Don Was at the Capitol Records Tower in Los Angeles, winning him over with a stunning performance of Bonnie Raitt’s “I Can’t Make You Love Me” (the original of which he had coincidentally produced). “That song is so soulful. When I first heard that song, it almost moved me to tears,” Springs says. “I wrote my own arrangement for it a few years before I played it for him.”

Now as Springs continues to develop as singer and songwriter in her own right, she’ll surely win over many other hearts. “I would like to be known as one of the younger people that are keeping jazz and soul alive and vibrant, “she says. “I love the realness of jazz and soul.”

 

 

“Kandace has a voice that could melt snow”

 

– Prince

 

“Soul Eyes features an eclectic mix of originals and

 

covers about love and romance that cater perfectly to

 

Springs’ alluring alto and innovative piano arrangements.”

 

–  Billboard

 

“This gently acoustic, sophisticated and affecting

 

album is one of the year’s best so far.”

 

– The Times of London, ★★★★★

 

“She has a rare ability that can’t be taught – to sound

 

like an old soul, just doing what comes naturally.”

 

– The Guardian, ★★★★

 

 

 

Nov-21-17 12:00 AM Marshall Crenshaw at City Vineyard About:

VOICES ON THE HUDSON

This winter, City Vineyard (233 West St in Hudson River Park) will transform into a cozy, intimate music venue where acclaimed national touring artists will perform against the gorgeous background of the Hudson River and the downtown NYC skyline. These special shows will be limited to 100 guests who will be able to enjoy thenew winter bistro menu and a full bar before, during and after the show. SEE THE FULL LINEUP HERE

 

 

Tickets are $20, but day of show will be $24 

 

Over the course of a recording career that’s spanned three decades, 13 albums and hundreds of songs, Marshall Crenshaw’s musical output has maintained a consistently high level of artistry, craftsmanship and passion, endearing him to a broad and loyal fanbase. After getting an early break playing John Lennon in a touring company of the Broadway musical Beatlemania, Crenshaw began his recording career with the now-legendary indie single “Something’s Gonna Happen.” His growing notoriety in his adopted hometown of New York  City helped to win Crenshaw a deal with Warner Bros. Records, which released his self-titled 1982 debut album. That collection established Crenshaw as one of the era’s preeminent rock ’ n’ rollers, and that was confirmed by such subsequent albums as Field Day, Downtown, Mary Jean & 9 Others, Good Evening, Life’s Too Short, Miracle of Science, #447, What’s in the Bag? and Jaggedland.

 

Along the way, Crenshaw’s compositions have been covered by a broad array of performers, including Bette Midler, Kelly Willis, Robert Gordon, Ronnie Spector, Marti Jones and the Gin Blossoms, with whom Crenshaw co-wrote the Top 10 single “Til I Hear It From You.” He’s also provided music for several film soundtracks, appeared in the films La Bamba (in which he portrayed Buddy Holly) and Peggy Sue Got Married, and was nominated for Grammy and a Golden Globe awards for writing the title track for the film comedy Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story. Since 2011, Crenshaw has also hosted his own radio show, The Bottomless Pit, on New York’s WFUV.

 

Nov-21-17 08:00 PM Hot Tuna
Nov-22-17 12:00 AM Riverside Jazz at City Vineyard: Matt Darriau and XALAM Trio About:
Nov-22-17 08:00 PM Hot Tuna
Nov-25-17 08:00 PM Lloyd Cole About:

Lloyd Cole, though he’d never be so gauche as to suggest it himself, has enjoyed something of a renaissance in 2013. He released his new ‘career best’ album ‘Standards’ in the summer. He also found himself with star billing on the UK’s

finest music TV show ‘Later With Jools Holland’. He has been playing to sell-out houses across Europe ever since.

Cole played his first electric shows in a decade in January 2014 and the ‘never ending’ solo acoustic tour resumed in March, crossing Europe, New Zealand and Australia.

But still the album was not released in North America. At last this has been put right and ‘Standards’ will be released on Omnivore Recordings on September 30th. Cole expects to play a few select US shows in the fall with a fuller schedule in early 2015.

Recorded in late 2012 to early 2013 in Los Angeles, New York and at his home in Easthampton, Massachusetts, ‘Standards’ is produced by Lloyd and mixed by maverick German producer Olaf Opal. All songs are by Lloyd Cole apart from ‘California Earthquake’, which was written by American folk artist John Hartford.

Inspired in part by the vitality he found in septuagenarian Dylan’s acclaimed 2012 album ‘Tempest’ - says Cole, 52: “I took it as a kick up the backside...” – ‘Standards’ is a gloriously electric rock’n’roll record and arguably the best thing he has made since his groundbreaking debut with the Commotions, 1984’s ‘Rattlesnakes’.

The band Lloyd assembled for ‘Standards’ comprises Fred Maher (Material, Scritti Politti, Lou Reed) on drums and Matthew Sweet on bass reforming the rhythm section from Lloyd’s debut solo album 1990’s ‘Lloyd Cole’ and its follow up ‘Don’t Get Weird On Me Babe’. With Joan (As Police Woman) Wasser on piano/backing vocals, and Lloyd not only singing but playing synths amidst some of the crispest, stormiest, most stinging electric guitar, it’s a tight ship with a tight sound which tautens and relaxes according to the temper of the song. Augmenting the basic band are Lloyd’s son Will, Mark Schwaber and Matt Cullen on guitars, Commotions keyboardist Blair Cowan, percussionist Michael Wyzik and backing vocalist and Negative Dave Derby.

 

Nov-26-17 12:00 AM Brunch & Wine Pairing Class About:

Indulge your senses with a three course brunch & wine pairing class!

Enjoy the pleasures of urban wine country in the heart of SoHo at this Three Course Brunch & Wine Pairing Class at City Winery starting at 12:00pm on Sunday, November 26th. Led by our wine director, you will sample some of our finest wines, specifically paired with each course.