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  The Bowery Ballroom
URL
Address: 6 Delancey Street
City: New York
State: NY
Date Time Event Description
Sep-04-19 07:00 PM Joey Pecoraro with Ian Ewing
Sep-05-19 06:00 PM Cold Hart, Horse Head with Fish Narc, Yawns, Lil Zubin, Fantasy Camp
Sep-05-19 06:00 PM Horse Head Tickets (16+ Event)
Sep-06-19 09:00 PM Gouranga Presents
Sep-07-19 08:00 PM Guerilla Toss with Machine Girl, LEYA
Analog synthesizers give tangible life to the works of Guerilla Toss. Whether it be the sound of a rocket ship, a kitten-with-a-wah, distorted dolphins, or a clavichord made out of honey-baked ham, the band consistently finds new ways to bring together the many ideas that combine to shape each new batch of art-rock puzzle pieces. Twisted Crystal, Guerilla Toss new LP, feels more personal than ever for the band. Angular yet irresistibly catchy, this collection of pop songs pulls influence from powerful groups like The Slits, ESG, Gina X, and early Madonna, with sing-speak vocals from Kassie Carlson nodding to legendary artists like Laurie Anderson, Grace Jones, and Lizzy Mercier Descloux combining this all into a twisted, crystalline concoction. Oracles and enigmatic egos are common lyrical themes, but charismatic instrumentality springs the listener back to extraterrestrial comfort. Old favorite sounds ring true from the trusty Sequential Circuits Six Track Synthesizer and Clavia Drum Machine. New, more refined sounds are molded and polished by drummer/producer Peter Negroponte, whose passion for perfection and creation goes far beyond an all-consuming Tetris effect. Peter has truly excelled on this new recording, creating a complex networks of beats and sound that become easily intertwined with the rhythmic fabric of life. Raised in a devoutly religious family, vocalist Kassie Carlson started performing at the age of five. She often participated in large pastoral choral performances, as well as her familys four-part harmony gospel quartet, making her no stranger to the stage. Growing up under the fear of God leaves a distinct footprint on your perception. An omnipresent male dictates not only your present waking life but also the rest of your eternity. Discovering a rock band was more than self-expression for Kassie, it was a manifestation of a self-healing temple, a personal pipeline for power. What better way to part the waters of toxic sludge than a matriarchal shout?Arian Shafiee, Guerilla Toss resident textural-guitar guru, is inspired by aspects of non-Western tuning and extended techniques. He designs moments of dense, glistening, pitch-shifted harmony and measured strumming that link classical impressionism to no-wave and early minimal music. His recent solo work truly comes through on this new record, as he tethers fantastical surreality to noise rock to deconstructed Middle Eastern pop music.Keyboardist Sam Lisabeth paws the keys with distinct virtuosity and expressive sass. A new member, Stephen Cooper (of the band Cloud Becomes Your Hand), binds the group with an urgent, disciplined, and melodic style. The hypnotic, ostinato-like basslines and up front rhythm tracks guide and grip each song like gravity, keeping the listener from swirling off into the cosmos.In albums past, Kassies performances resembled more of a manic, possessed high priestess; humming at the gates of hell, hacking telepathy and tugging the strings of every audience member. Twisted Crystal goes beyond this familiar darkness, leading us into a rhythmically calming charm with deep wisdom, serenity, and understanding. What is a twisted crystal? And who told you it would heal?At times the listener wanders through mazes of dizzying, alternately pulsing time signatures, but the roads always bounce, meet and magically snap back together. That meditative groove, both live and in the studio, has become signature for Guerilla Toss, drawing deep influence from 70s krautrock and experimental rock music like Tom Tom Club, Talking Heads, Brian Eno, Neu!, Cluster, Todd Rundgren, and La Dusseldorf.A constantly evolving, living breathing entity, the band now presents the album Twisted Crystal. Enjoy the same surrealistic, kinetic healing energy of live Guerilla Toss, today in your own home.Magic is Easy. Hypnotize yourself well.
Sep-08-19 07:00 PM Benny Sings with Argonaut & Wasp
Dutch singer, songwriter and producer. Born in Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 1977. He formed his first band 'The Loveboat' in high school. Studied sonology at the Koninklijk Conservatorium, Den Haag. Joined the hip-hop group Abstract Dialect as bassist in 1999, taking the stage name Benny Sings. He formed Heavenly Social with Dee Ferguson that same year, also working with De Toffen. Started his solo career in 2003.
Sep-09-19 07:00 PM Dominic Fike with Deb Never
Sep-10-19 08:00 PM Fontaines D.C. with Pottery
Is it too real for ya?We were encouraging each other to be who we believed ourselves to be all the time - Grian Chatten, lead vocals, Fontaines D.C.With the best bands, it seems to happen fast. The trajectory is steep, the progression seemingly preordained, inexorable. Assembling whilst still at college in Dublin a mere three years ago, from the ruins of early nowhere bands, and having discovered a shared love of poetry and a common zeal for authentic self-expression, the evolution of Fontaines D.C. has been swift, sure and seemingly effortless. Three self-released seven-inch singles (the first of which, Liberty Belle, emerged in May 2017) each a confident step onward from its predecessor, and a relentless schedule of live shows have seen them progress at a prodigious, yet wholly logical pace. Through around 200 dates in the UK, Europe, and the US, one word has kept resurfacing in their characteristically eloquent yet direct interviews: authenticity. I think there's an authenticity to what we do, and people have been starved of authenticity for too long, Chatten said in one early Irish radio encounter. Not youthful bravado, but a truthful reflection of the shared code that has guided these five young best friends thus far, with what has occasionally seemed a preternatural combination of insouciance and self-belief. This commitment to the authentic, in their music and in each other, is key to understanding the Fontaines D.C. aesthetic. In the course of going round bars, drinking and writing poetry and romanticizing it to bits, according to bassist Conor Deegan, the band pushed each other to create, always keeping a collective eye on keeping it real. Wed call each other out Chatten has explained, adding, through each other, we found ourselves a lot quicker.Alongside this commitment to each other and the shared goal, another overarching formative dynamic was at work: Dublin City itself; more specifically, the disappearing Dublin embodied most readily in their immediate surroundings, the old working-class neighborhood known as The Liberties. As with so many of our cities, the modern malaise of gentrification is steadily claiming vast swathes of the Irish capital. Sure, that's progress, but the underlying cultural cost of this air-brushing of an environment is something that has preoccupied Chatten, feeding into much of the Fontaines lyrical content, and indeed the early singles' artwork which featured long-gone, semi-mythical figures like Bang Bang and Forty Coats, real-life quasi-Dickensian characters, legendary in their own time but now becoming lost in the city's fading folklore. Chatten speaks of writing about the dying romance of the city...the reason we love the Liberties is that seems to be where a lot of that action is happening, It would be a mistake to view this as some sighing nostalgia, however. Rather, it speaks to the place of Fontaines D.C. in a broader Irish cultural lineage: the bloodline that is more Behan than Bono, evoking poets such as Kavanagh and Lynott, Chevron and MacGowan and yes, even Joyce in the expression of the universal and profoundly human experience through the prism of the local, the familiar, the real. As Lou Reed did with New York, or Ray Davies with London, or indeed The Smiths with Manchester. Write what you know, as the old advice goes. Or, in the words of guitarist Conor Curley: From talking to these guys about literature, I saw Irishness as being easily romantic about what you see.It's a through-line that can be discovered in all the best of Irish art, whichever the medium, and the band's intent is drolly embodied in the album's knowing title: Dogrel. To give it its dictionary definition (or close enough for now): crude verse of little artistic worth. The ribald rhymes of the docks, the factories and the early houses. The authentic poetry of the people, which any smart Irish poet knows it is foolish to think oneself above. For in it all is an ineffable beauty, something these young men understand very well.Not that Dogrel isn't rock and roll; it most assuredly is, the best example of the form that you are likely to hear this or any other year. It spits, it snarls, it snaps with the very best of them. But also it yearns, like the greatest Irish music must do. In songs like the almost unbearably sad Dublin City Sky there is a marriage of the lyrical to the poetic tradition that bears comparison not just with MacGowan's (the Pogues) best work but echoes the exquisite heartbreak of Luke Kelly's timeless reading of Kavanagh's On Raglan Road. This is an example of one of the great strengths of Dogrel; its diversity makes it feel less like a debut and more like the work of a band who have long since proven their point, as I suspect Fontaines D.C. may well feel that they have; to the very people who matter above all: each other. From the short, sharp opener Big (surely rivalling I Wanna Be Adored as an irresistible opening statement of self-confident intent) the album delightfully surprises at every turn. The singles sit fully at ease along much more complex, emotionally loaded pieces such as Roy's Tune and The Lotts, both examples of a bruised but unbowed melancholia which is the record's true genome. Television Screen, shares its title with the first ever Irish punk single (by The Radiators From Space featuring future Pogue and another of the great chroniclers of old Dublin Town, the late Philip Chevron) and it is a different beast again: melodic and stately, it's a perfect example of the untimely, almost unnatural maturity that this band has already attained. Boys in The Better Land, in another twist, perfectly captures the spirit of the album's title. Among a blizzard of evocative couplets, He spits out 'Brits Out" and only smokes Carroll's, stands out as great a pencil portrait as you'll find anywhere. That Lou Reed thing again.As a band, Fontaines D.C. are on fire throughout: witness the brief, urgent mechanical grind of Chequeless Reckless, which perhaps comes closest to a Fontaines D.C. manifesto: "A sellout is someone who becomes a hypocrite in the name of money. An idiot is someone who lets their education do all of their thinking. A phony is someone who demands respect for the principles they affect. A dilettante is someone who can't tell the difference between fashion and style. Charisma is exquisite manipulation. And money... is the sandpit of the soul. Spat out by Chatten with palpable contempt, they are words that could come back to haunt him, but he's smarter than that, and anyway, somewhere Mister Wilde is wryly smiling. Dogrel is a debut which is best enjoyed as a whole; it is very much in the grand tradition of the album as art form, just as this is a band very much in the classic band mold: great singles, an indefatigable work ethic and an utter aversion to standing still.Reluctant to be viewed as part of any wider movement (I get a bit uncomfortable with some of the comparisons that have been made, says Chatten, as he must, though they inevitably shall be) Fontaines D.C. have delivered on their tremendous promise in a way that few bands have. It is to their credit and it augurs well that their collective eye is already on the next phase as they prepare for now to merely take on the world for real. Too real.
Sep-11-19 08:00 PM Marc Rebillet
Here you will learn everything you need to know about Marc Rebillet, aka Marc "Loop Daddy" Rebillet, aka Marc I paid you to be a DJ for my wedding, not to waste the atmosphere with your shits Rebillet, an artist, actor, musician, composer, humorist, philosopher and phone psychotherapist who explores the realms of the looping art through such mainstream themes as rape, buttholes, or herpes.Marc was spiritually born around 2007 in an iPhone waiting line. Hearing a voice in the bathroom calling him on a mission, he went there and found fortune. He then launched his big plan for ruling the world, based on pooping on everything. He failed, but his aspirations remain intact.Taking advantage of the huge popularity he immediately reached on YouTube (14 subscribers in less than a day), he bought a BOSS RC-505 loop station. To cook rice? No, asshole, to make loops. Some may ask: "Why looping?" and Marc would probably answer: "I don't know man, I just do what I like". But don't be fooled, we all know the reason is that he's just a lazy dumbass.Despite what you might expect, he learned to play the piano at 5. Immediately noticed by his teachers, he became the boy we all know as the "Mozart of Dallas" in no time, composing his best masterpieces before reaching age 12. He then fell sick, ravaged by an inexplicable melancholy.Desperate, his parents tried everything to cure him. From therapists to beating the shit out of him, including his uncle Jimmy trying to help with "special bedroom sessions", nothing seemed to lead to recovery. He got worse.Let's go back to the BOSS RC-505 loop station, much better than the 202, even the 101, if it ever existed.Did you know that the BOSS RC-505 loop station can be operated with the hands, and is absolutely perfect for beatboxers, vocalists, club performers, and normal people who liked to hear the word butthole 13452 times, without actually having to pronounce the whole of it? Not to mention it has not 1, not 2, not 3, not 4, but 5 stereo phrase tracks, with dedicated controls and independent volume faders (so you can lower your voice with a touch, instead of running far away from the microphone, as our ancestors used to do). It includes a wide range of Input FX and Track FX, who gives a fuck about the meaning of this, but you'll be happy to know it's useful for processing loops. It contains a DJ (I'm imagining a real guy delivered with the BOSS RC-505, what a comic thought) and sampler-style effects, like the priceless robot voice, or the famous and traditionally misogynist "woman voice".You can register no less than 99 phrases. As the famous actor once said: "Wow". But wait, could you guess that these 99 phrases each contain 5 phrase tracks, custom effects and even, even, ladies and gentlemen, you won't believe it: and even MORE? What does more mean, you might ask? Copywriters are not well-paid for product descriptions, so fuck you. Are we finished with that advertising-in-disguise? Yes, we are, but a last word before we move on to another fascinating subject: the BOSS RC-505 includes 85 onboard rhythm patterns. 85, motherfucker. I could cry about that.Now I know what you all want to know. Please, Marc, tell us everything about your keyboard! You mean my computer keyboard? Marc, is that a joke? I try to be funny and you trick me, you ungrateful bastards. Well ok, you win! I play on an M-Audio Axiom 49 Semi-Weighted USB MIDI controller! Are you happy now? Is that what you want? You want me to be serious? Do you want me to commit suicide? Do you want me to burn a post-office?Before bringing that appalling description to an end, I would like to remind to everyone 5 basic rules for a nice living on Earth:1. Stop that rape. No more rape. One more rape? No more rape.2. Big birds cant fly. Nope. It would be terrifying.3. Dont bother Jenny while shes cooking by playing Didjeridoo, especially under the couch.4. Dont bring Sheila to a restaurant if you have a mortgage.5. Woop poop babeladiledouda baps bops pepetapepetouta rinkinkinkinkin tikitiki tink.
Sep-12-19 08:00 PM Marc Rebillet
Here you will learn everything you need to know about Marc Rebillet, aka Marc "Loop Daddy" Rebillet, aka Marc I paid you to be a DJ for my wedding, not to waste the atmosphere with your shits Rebillet, an artist, actor, musician, composer, humorist, philosopher and phone psychotherapist who explores the realms of the looping art through such mainstream themes as rape, buttholes, or herpes.Marc was spiritually born around 2007 in an iPhone waiting line. Hearing a voice in the bathroom calling him on a mission, he went there and found fortune. He then launched his big plan for ruling the world, based on pooping on everything. He failed, but his aspirations remain intact.Taking advantage of the huge popularity he immediately reached on YouTube (14 subscribers in less than a day), he bought a BOSS RC-505 loop station. To cook rice? No, asshole, to make loops. Some may ask: "Why looping?" and Marc would probably answer: "I don't know man, I just do what I like". But don't be fooled, we all know the reason is that he's just a lazy dumbass.Despite what you might expect, he learned to play the piano at 5. Immediately noticed by his teachers, he became the boy we all know as the "Mozart of Dallas" in no time, composing his best masterpieces before reaching age 12. He then fell sick, ravaged by an inexplicable melancholy.Desperate, his parents tried everything to cure him. From therapists to beating the shit out of him, including his uncle Jimmy trying to help with "special bedroom sessions", nothing seemed to lead to recovery. He got worse.Let's go back to the BOSS RC-505 loop station, much better than the 202, even the 101, if it ever existed.Did you know that the BOSS RC-505 loop station can be operated with the hands, and is absolutely perfect for beatboxers, vocalists, club performers, and normal people who liked to hear the word butthole 13452 times, without actually having to pronounce the whole of it? Not to mention it has not 1, not 2, not 3, not 4, but 5 stereo phrase tracks, with dedicated controls and independent volume faders (so you can lower your voice with a touch, instead of running far away from the microphone, as our ancestors used to do). It includes a wide range of Input FX and Track FX, who gives a fuck about the meaning of this, but you'll be happy to know it's useful for processing loops. It contains a DJ (I'm imagining a real guy delivered with the BOSS RC-505, what a comic thought) and sampler-style effects, like the priceless robot voice, or the famous and traditionally misogynist "woman voice".You can register no less than 99 phrases. As the famous actor once said: "Wow". But wait, could you guess that these 99 phrases each contain 5 phrase tracks, custom effects and even, even, ladies and gentlemen, you won't believe it: and even MORE? What does more mean, you might ask? Copywriters are not well-paid for product descriptions, so fuck you. Are we finished with that advertising-in-disguise? Yes, we are, but a last word before we move on to another fascinating subject: the BOSS RC-505 includes 85 onboard rhythm patterns. 85, motherfucker. I could cry about that.Now I know what you all want to know. Please, Marc, tell us everything about your keyboard! You mean my computer keyboard? Marc, is that a joke? I try to be funny and you trick me, you ungrateful bastards. Well ok, you win! I play on an M-Audio Axiom 49 Semi-Weighted USB MIDI controller! Are you happy now? Is that what you want? You want me to be serious? Do you want me to commit suicide? Do you want me to burn a post-office?Before bringing that appalling description to an end, I would like to remind to everyone 5 basic rules for a nice living on Earth:1. Stop that rape. No more rape. One more rape? No more rape.2. Big birds cant fly. Nope. It would be terrifying.3. Dont bother Jenny while shes cooking by playing Didjeridoo, especially under the couch.4. Dont bring Sheila to a restaurant if you have a mortgage.5. Woop poop babeladiledouda baps bops pepetapepetouta rinkinkinkinkin tikitiki tink.