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  New York Public Library for the Performing Arts
URL
Address: 40 Lincoln Center Plaza
City: New York
State: NY
Date Time Event Description
Jan-17-18 06:30 PM "Leonard Bernstein at 100" Join the American Friends of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra and America Israel Cultural Foundation at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts for a private viewing of "Leonard Bernstein at 100" followed by a reception.  Wednesday, January 17, 2018 6:30pm – 8:00pm Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center 40 Lincoln Center Plaza (entrance on Amsterdam Avenue) Leonard Bernstein at 100 Leonard Bernstein at 100 celebrates the centennial of America's greatest classical composer and conductor.  Drawing from more than 150 photographs, personal items, papers, scores, correspondence, costumes, furniture and films, Leonard Bernstein at 100 is the official exhibit of the centennial and is the most comprehensive retrospective of Bernstein's life and career ever staged in a museum setting.    
Jan-18-18 06:00 PM Davalois Fearon: Finding Her History Davalois Fearon is a critically acclaimed dancer, teacher, and choreographer born on the island of Jamaica and raised in The Bronx, New York. She is the founder and Artistic Director of Davalois Fearon Dance. Her choreography has been presented throughout New York City, including at the Joyce Theater, E-Moves 17 dance series, The Dance Enthusiast “Moving Caribbean in NYC,” the Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance, Roulette, and the Inception to Exhibition Dance Festival, as well as in Berkeley (CA), Portland (OR), Tampa (FL), and Kingston, Jamaica. Fearon comes to the Library in search of her history. What does it mean to be a black woman on stage? What is the map of a segregated self? Join us for an evening of personal history, original dance, archival performance screening, and discussion. (If you need assistance with online reservations, please visit the welcome desk at the Library for the Performing Arts' Lincoln Center Plaza entrance, where volunteers will make a reservation for you, even if you do not use email. For free events, The Library generally overbooks to ensure a full house. All registered seats are released 15 minutes before start time, so we recommend that you arrive early.)
Jan-23-18 07:00 PM Bernstein Family Memories Bob Santelli, curator of the centennial exhibition Leonard Bernstein at 100, leads a conversation with Jamie Anne Bernstein, Nina Maria Felicia Bernstein, Alexander Bernstein, and other special guests. (If you need assistance with online reservations, please visit the welcome desk at the Library for the Performing Arts' Lincoln Center Plaza entrance, where volunteers will make a reservation for you, even if you do not use email. For free events, The Library generally overbooks to ensure a full house. All registered seats are released 15 minutes before start time, so we recommend that you arrive early.)
Jan-25-18 06:00 PM Bernstein Findings: What is American Music? January 18, 1950 – WNYC, live from Tanglewood: “Here, seated around two pianos are four of the leading American composers – Aaron Copland, Leonard Bernstein, Lucas Foss, and Irving Fine… Probably the best way to give you a good picture of what American music promises for the future, is to just throw the topic to the four gentlemen, like tossing it to the lions, as it were, and let them bat it around…” As part of our Bernstein centennial celebration, the Library reconsiders the question “What is American Music.” After listening to a historic WNYC recording of Bernstein and his contemporaries, a diverse quartet of contemporary music makers, including Caroline Shaw, Esperanza Spalding, Vijay Iyer, and John Luther Adams, gather around the piano to discuss a new definition for what is American. (If you need assistance with online reservations, please visit the welcome desk at the Library for the Performing Arts' Lincoln Center Plaza entrance, where volunteers will make a reservation for you, even if you do not use email. For free events, The Library generally overbooks to ensure a full house. All registered seats are released 15 minutes before start time, so we recommend that you arrive early.)
Jan-26-18 10:00 AM Jerome Robbins Symposium The Jerome Robbins Dance Division celebrates the centennial of Jerome Robbins with a day long symposium, featuring presentations by Library fellows, including Alastair Macaulay, Julie Lemberger, Adrian Danchig-Waring, Ninotchka Bennahum, Robert Greskovic, and Hiie Saumaa. The following is the schedule for the day: 10:00am-10:45am  Alastair Macaulay An Investigation of Nijinsky's ballet ''L'Après-midi d'un faune' and Robbins’ ballet 'Afternoon of a Faun', Examining Differences and Connections 11:00am-11:45am  Julie Lemberger  What He Saw – What She Saw: West Side Story, and other views of dance and dancers behind the scenes:  Discovering photography by Jerome Robbins and Martha Swope 12:00pm-12:45pm  Ninotchka Bennahum Jerome Robbins’ Painterly Eye: War, Exile, and the Founding of American Ballet Theatre 1:00pm-2:00pm Lunch (NOT provided) 2:00pm-2:45pm  Robert Greskovic Robbins and Chopin: Easy Action 3:00pm-3:45pm  Hiie Saumaa Jerome Robbins, Composer in Words 4:00pm-4:45pm  Adrian Danchig-Waring The Drama Of Space: Exploring Jerome Robbins’ Ballet Language (If you need assistance with online reservations, please visit the welcome desk at the Library for the Performing Arts' Lincoln Center Plaza entrance, where volunteers will make a reservation for you, even if you do not use email. For free events, The Library generally overbooks to ensure a full house. All registered seats are released 15 minutes before start time, so we recommend that you arrive early.)
Jan-30-18 07:00 PM Music for a City Under Siege Dmitri Shostakovich wrote his Symphony no. 7, as Nazi bombs exploded outside his windows. Under siege in the city of Leningrad, Shostakovich wrote an epic symphony that seemed to mock the evil violence of the Nazis and celebrate the unbreakable will of the Russian people. The score, copied to microfilm, was smuggled across the world and delivered to Toscanini. On July 19, 1942, the NBC Symphony premiered the work as an airborne weapon for freedom. Hear the legendary broadcast of Shostakovich’s “Leningrad” Symphony, along with excerpts from Armed Forces Radio collection. (If you need assistance with online reservations, please visit the welcome desk at the Library for the Performing Arts' Lincoln Center Plaza entrance, where volunteers will make a reservation for you, even if you do not use email. For free events, The Library generally overbooks to ensure a full house. All registered seats are released 15 minutes before start time, so we recommend that you arrive early.) This event takes place in the Library for the Performing Arts' Cafe, on the first floor, Lincoln Center plaza level. Enter via the Cafe entrance by ascending the stairs at the corner of Amsterdam Ave. and West 65th St. Mobility impaired people may enter via 111 Amsterdam Ave. This program is supported by