Webtunes



<-- Venues

  New York Public Library for the Performing Arts
URL
Address: 40 Lincoln Center Plaza
City: New York
State: NY
Date Time Event Description
Sep-26-18 01:00 PM David Vaughan's The Dance Historian is In: 200 Years of Petipa, Part 1 David Vaughan was the archivist of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company and author of Merce Cunningham/65 Years and Frederick Ashton and His Ballets. From 2012- 2017, Mr. Vaughan held monthly screenings of his favorite dance films and videos from our collection. David passed away in October 2017, and the Jerome Robbins Dance Division will continue screenings in his honor with guest hosts. In celebration of the bicentennial of Marius Petipa’s birth, The New York Times’ Chief Dance Critic Alastair Macaulay will start off the Dance Historian season with an exploration into the work of this master choreographer. This is part one of a two-part presentation.  (If you need assistance with online reservations, please visit the welcome desk at the Library for the Performing Arts' Lincoln Center Plaza entrance, where volunteers will make a reservation for you, even if you do not use email. For free events, The Library generally overbooks to ensure a full house. All registered seats are released 15 minutes before start time, so we recommend that you arrive early.) ASL interpretation and real-time (CART) captioning available upon request. Please submit your request at least two weeks in advance by emailing accessibility@nypl.org
Sep-27-18 06:00 PM A Life Among Legends: Dr. Glory Van Scott in conversation with Lynn Garafola and David Robertson A Life Among Legends: Dr. Glory Van Scott in conversation with Jennifer Dunning and David Robertson Says writer Erica Jong, "In this book you will learn of the great women in her family who came before her, of her cousin Emmett Till, whose death from racism is an unforgettable lesson for all Americans,  and of the propulsive hope that enables excellence. Glory has worked with all the greats: George Balanchine, Katherine Dunham, Agnes de Mille.  She has the rare ability to learn from everyone and to say No when her artistic intuition tells her to...I admire her talent, guts and passion." And New York Times Critic, Jennifer Dunning writes... "Stories pour out of her, fascinating,  perceptive and often funny...It is suddenly easy to see in her the Dr. Glory who, a terrifyingly efficient mother hen, keeps track of old and ailing colleagues and helps them with wills and adjustments to their nursing homes.  But still, but still... "  Help us celebrate Dr. Glory Van Scott and the release of her memoir Glory: A Life Among Legends 5:00 pm book siging in the Bruno Walter Auditorium lobby.  (If you need assistance with online reservations, please visit the welcome desk at the Library for the Performing Arts' Lincoln Center Plaza entrance, where volunteers will make a reservation for you, even if you do not use email. For free events, The Library generally overbooks to ensure a full house. All registered seats are released 15 minutes before start time, so we recommend that you arrive early.) ASL interpretation and real-time (CART) captioning available upon request. Please submit your request at least two weeks in advance by emailing accessibility@nypl.org.
Oct-15-18 06:00 PM A Tribute to Camille Billops and James V. Hatch: 50 Years of Breaking Rules and Building the Arts A free program screening two films and paying tribute to the art and activism of Camille Billops and James V. Hatch, with eminent scholar and Swarthmore president Valerie Smith and the acclaimed playwright and director George C. Wolfe, and moderated by scholar/film producer/curator, Michelle Materre of Creatively Speaking.  Cosponsored by the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts and Third World Newsreel and partly sponsored by a Humanities New York Action Grant. Films: Take Your Bags (11 min, 1998) -"My take on slavery: When the Africans boarded the ships bound for America, they carried in their bags all their memories of home. When they arrived in the New World, their bags had been switched, and in them they found n*****, beast, slave,...Many generations later, the children of these Africans toured the Museum of Modern Art to see the sculptures and art of Picasso, Braque and Matisse. Lo! There were the beautiful icons of their ancestors, the images that had been stolen from their bags."--Camille Billops Finding Christa (55 min, 1991) This documentary presents a moving yet unsentimental view of motherhood and adoption, exploring the feelings surrounding the reunion of a young woman with her natural mother 20 years after being given up for adoption. The reunion is between filmmaker Cmille Billops and her and her own daughter. Facing the re-encounter with mixed emotions, Billops interrogates her family and friends as well as her own motivations behind the decision. The result is an original and personal film that challenges societal biases aboutadoption and offers new insight on mother-daughter relationships. About the filmmakers: Camille Billops, a Black visual artist and filmmaker, has worked with her husband James Hatch for over 5 decades to make incredible, viscerally strong art and films about her life and family that challenge broader issues in many ways – questioning the meaning of art, black art, and how art can be used as a tool to promote individual as well as collective cultural awareness, pride, and activism – and the constant impact of race, racism and sexism. Billops and Hatch’s works reflect social, economic, and political issues, that remain relevant and controversial today in the US, as they were when they started their careers. Their films in particular deal with the roles of women, domestic abuse, art, and always, race and racism.
Oct-15-18 06:00 PM Insider Access to the NYPL Theater Collection Join the NYPL's theater curator for a behind-the-scenes tour of the fabulous collection at Lincoln Center. A must-do for theater fans! The New York Public Library has the world’s leading collection of theater history. Join Doug Reside, the library’s theater curator, for this fascinating dive into its treasures. You’ll be able to get up close to priceless artifacts from shows like "West Side Story," and see other objects that are rarely on display. Best of all, you’ll be able to have all your theater history questions answered by a true expert.
Oct-17-18 07:00 PM The Public Theater Mobile Unit Presents A MIDSUMMER NIGHTS DREAM This fall, a classic New York City block party becomes the enchanted setting where fairies work their mischief in Shakespeare’s beloved play A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM.Acclaimed director Jenny Koons takes you to the royal wedding of Theseus and Hippolyta, where a celebratory play is being rehearsed. But the real drama is unfolding in the concrete jungle of fairy King Oberon. There, four young New Yorkers discover the course of true love runs anything but smooth, as supernatural sprites and the lovable Puck conspire to reveal what fools we mortals be, and draw us all into the collective dream of romance and merriment.Mobile Unit is a reinvention of Joseph Papp’s Mobile Shakespeare program, beginning in 1957 with the simple idea that theater belongs to everyone, evolving into the New York Shakespeare Festival and ultimately becoming The Public Theater. Now in its eighth year, the Mobile Unit meets audiences where they are by presenting world-class Shakespeare and other works in recreation centers, prisons, senior centers, schools, and other community gathering places across the five boroughs. The Mobile Unit has already toured Henry V, The Winter’s Tale, Twelfth Night, Hamlet, Romeo & Juliet, The Comedy of Errors, Macbeth, Pericles, Measure for Measure, Richard III, and Much Ado About Nothing.  This event takes place in the Library for the Performing Arts' Cafe, on the first floor, Lincoln Center plaza level.  Enter via the Cafe entrance by ascending the stairs at the corner of Amsterdam Ave. and West 65th St. Mobility impaired people may enter via 111 Amsterdam Ave. (If you need assistance with online reservations, please visit the welcome desk at the Library for the Performing Arts' Lincoln Center Plaza entrance, where volunteers will make a reservation for you, even if you do not use email. For free events, The Library generally overbooks to ensure a full house. All registered seats are released 15 minutes before start time, so we recommend that you arrive early.) ASL interpretation and real-time (CART) captioning available upon request. Please submit your request at least two weeks in advance by emailing accessibility@nypl.org