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City: New York
State: NY
Date Time Event Description
Aug-17-18 12:30 AM ZACCAI CURTIS QUARTET After 18 years performing as the Curtis Brothers, Zaccai Curtis ads his voice to the music world. Musically stemming from Donald Harrison's "Nouveau Swing" style, this ensemble differs by keeping the percussion in focus while mixing Latin music with today's modern Jazz.



Zaccai Curtis *
Zaccai Curtis @ Twitter *
Aug-17-18 08:00 PM KYLE EASTWOOD In the 17 years since the release of From There To Here, Kyle Eastwood's first album as a leader, the multi-talented double bassist, composer and producer has forged a dynamic musical path. His artistry is eclectic, yet refined and transcends the boundaries of jazz by exploring an ever-widening range of musical influences. While continuing to develop his parallel career as a composer and arranger on his legendary father Clint's Oscar nominated films "Mystic River," "Million Dollar Baby" and "Letters from Iwo Jima," Eastwood has reaffirmed traditions while creating truly contemporary, lyrical and melodic jazz. He has flirted with electro-jazz cool on Paris Blue (2004); delved into 70s-tinged "smooth jazz" accents and grooves on Now (2006); and gone "arty" urban chic on the subtly mixed Metropolitan (2009).

Eastwood's latest release Time Pieces is all at once a fresh landmark in Eastwood's discography and a culmination of a recent reassessment of his personal and artistic aesthetic that began with the release of Songs From the Chateau in 2011. The new phase of his career has involved a powerfully swinging, yet eminently sensual quintet of young English musicians: starting with Andrew McCormack (piano), Quentin Collins (trumpet and flugelhorn) and now including Brandon Allen (tenor and soprano sax) and Ernesto Simpson (drums). Eastwood brilliantly confirmed this new creative foundation on The View From Here (2013), often giving the impression of connecting with jazz archetypes while focusing on the pure joy of group interaction.

Time Pieces is a rich extension of this ongoing "transition," a work infused with melodic elegance and a sustained sense of groove organized around the quintet's often-collective compositions. It also features a thoughtful and sensual reading of Herbie Hancock's "Dolphin Dance" and a dense, lightning fast romp through Horace Silver's "Blowin' The Blues Away" that reflect the bassist's passion for lyrical hard bop. The collection launches with the infectious, spirited and funky "Caipirinha." Following the Silver and Hancock re-imaginings, the band digs in with the lively and swinging "boogaloo" grooves of "Prosecco Smile," then eases into the seductive melancholy of "Vista" and the freewheeling high energy "Peace of Silver," fashioned as a tribute to the jazz piano legend who passed away during the recording of Time Pieces.

With its subtle marching beat and moody, sensual sway, "Incantation," finds a direct heart line to the lyricism of Wayne Shorter. Eastwood finds new expression for one of his memorable film scores, "Letters From Iwo Jima," which he follows with the hypnotic, meditative "Nostalgique" and the feisty, hard- swinging bebop explosion "Bullet Train." Time Pieces wraps with the fun and freewheeling visit to the "Corner of 3rd and 6th Avenue," while the album's limited edition, four side LP version includes the gently bluesy, easy rolling Miles Davis tune "Pfrancing (No Blues)." The Miles track features a different American based ensemble: pianist Richard Germanson, trumpeter Alex Norris, tenor saxman Jason Rigby and drummer Joe Strasser.
"What I wanted to do in this record is pay my debt to jazz in the late 50s and early 60s, says Eastwood. "It was this lyrical hard bop, full of groove and sophisticated harmonies, exemplified by Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers when Lee Morgan and Wayne Shorter were in the group, Horace Silver's Blue Note recordings and different quintets Miles had throughout the 60s. It's the music that I like and that has never ceased to fascinate me since I discovered it as a teenager. What was amazing at the time was how all these groups had an immediately identifiable sound signature. I wondered where this singularity emerged from and I concluded that this was primarily the result of a collective work in the long run. It is this way of thinking and music making that I sought to reconnect with on this new album."

Although Eastwood was deeply inspired by the sounds and group aesthetic of that rarefied time in jazz history, Time Pieces is a mature work that doesn't borrow forms of the past superficially. Instead, it constantly manages to find a powerful balance between the more assertive hard bop at the turn of the 60s (in its relationship to the blues and in its orchestral potential) and a resolutely contemporary way to interpret this tradition. The bassist and his band bring their unique individual and collective experiences to the project, collectively drawing on the history of popular music and jazz to create a rich, diverse and contemporary experience that taps into everything from pop and rock to electro and the many forms of African-American music.

"This great ensemble I'm working with is designed like a true musical collective," Eastwood adds. "I brought to the writing and recording sessions pieces of melodies and chord progressions, but most often the songs and their arrangements were crystallized in the studio during rehearsals. The association that I have with pianist Andrew McCormack and trumpeter Quentin Collins extends back almost 10 years now. It is a luxury to be able to develop a project on a long-term basis. That longevity is obviously reflected in the music we create. But if we're the heart and soul of this quintet, the newer musicians' ability to fit into our flow was equally important. Brandon Allen on saxophones and Ernesto Simpson on drums have truly enriched this album by opening our core sound to fresh and exciting new horizons."
Aug-17-18 10:30 PM KYLE EASTWOOD In the 17 years since the release of From There To Here, Kyle Eastwood's first album as a leader, the multi-talented double bassist, composer and producer has forged a dynamic musical path. His artistry is eclectic, yet refined and transcends the boundaries of jazz by exploring an ever-widening range of musical influences. While continuing to develop his parallel career as a composer and arranger on his legendary father Clint's Oscar nominated films "Mystic River," "Million Dollar Baby" and "Letters from Iwo Jima," Eastwood has reaffirmed traditions while creating truly contemporary, lyrical and melodic jazz. He has flirted with electro-jazz cool on Paris Blue (2004); delved into 70s-tinged "smooth jazz" accents and grooves on Now (2006); and gone "arty" urban chic on the subtly mixed Metropolitan (2009).

Eastwood's latest release Time Pieces is all at once a fresh landmark in Eastwood's discography and a culmination of a recent reassessment of his personal and artistic aesthetic that began with the release of Songs From the Chateau in 2011. The new phase of his career has involved a powerfully swinging, yet eminently sensual quintet of young English musicians: starting with Andrew McCormack (piano), Quentin Collins (trumpet and flugelhorn) and now including Brandon Allen (tenor and soprano sax) and Ernesto Simpson (drums). Eastwood brilliantly confirmed this new creative foundation on The View From Here (2013), often giving the impression of connecting with jazz archetypes while focusing on the pure joy of group interaction.

Time Pieces is a rich extension of this ongoing "transition," a work infused with melodic elegance and a sustained sense of groove organized around the quintet's often-collective compositions. It also features a thoughtful and sensual reading of Herbie Hancock's "Dolphin Dance" and a dense, lightning fast romp through Horace Silver's "Blowin' The Blues Away" that reflect the bassist's passion for lyrical hard bop. The collection launches with the infectious, spirited and funky "Caipirinha." Following the Silver and Hancock re-imaginings, the band digs in with the lively and swinging "boogaloo" grooves of "Prosecco Smile," then eases into the seductive melancholy of "Vista" and the freewheeling high energy "Peace of Silver," fashioned as a tribute to the jazz piano legend who passed away during the recording of Time Pieces.

With its subtle marching beat and moody, sensual sway, "Incantation," finds a direct heart line to the lyricism of Wayne Shorter. Eastwood finds new expression for one of his memorable film scores, "Letters From Iwo Jima," which he follows with the hypnotic, meditative "Nostalgique" and the feisty, hard- swinging bebop explosion "Bullet Train." Time Pieces wraps with the fun and freewheeling visit to the "Corner of 3rd and 6th Avenue," while the album's limited edition, four side LP version includes the gently bluesy, easy rolling Miles Davis tune "Pfrancing (No Blues)." The Miles track features a different American based ensemble: pianist Richard Germanson, trumpeter Alex Norris, tenor saxman Jason Rigby and drummer Joe Strasser.
"What I wanted to do in this record is pay my debt to jazz in the late 50s and early 60s, says Eastwood. "It was this lyrical hard bop, full of groove and sophisticated harmonies, exemplified by Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers when Lee Morgan and Wayne Shorter were in the group, Horace Silver's Blue Note recordings and different quintets Miles had throughout the 60s. It's the music that I like and that has never ceased to fascinate me since I discovered it as a teenager. What was amazing at the time was how all these groups had an immediately identifiable sound signature. I wondered where this singularity emerged from and I concluded that this was primarily the result of a collective work in the long run. It is this way of thinking and music making that I sought to reconnect with on this new album."

Although Eastwood was deeply inspired by the sounds and group aesthetic of that rarefied time in jazz history, Time Pieces is a mature work that doesn't borrow forms of the past superficially. Instead, it constantly manages to find a powerful balance between the more assertive hard bop at the turn of the 60s (in its relationship to the blues and in its orchestral potential) and a resolutely contemporary way to interpret this tradition. The bassist and his band bring their unique individual and collective experiences to the project, collectively drawing on the history of popular music and jazz to create a rich, diverse and contemporary experience that taps into everything from pop and rock to electro and the many forms of African-American music.

"This great ensemble I'm working with is designed like a true musical collective," Eastwood adds. "I brought to the writing and recording sessions pieces of melodies and chord progressions, but most often the songs and their arrangements were crystallized in the studio during rehearsals. The association that I have with pianist Andrew McCormack and trumpeter Quentin Collins extends back almost 10 years now. It is a luxury to be able to develop a project on a long-term basis. That longevity is obviously reflected in the music we create. But if we're the heart and soul of this quintet, the newer musicians' ability to fit into our flow was equally important. Brandon Allen on saxophones and Ernesto Simpson on drums have truly enriched this album by opening our core sound to fresh and exciting new horizons."
Aug-18-18 12:30 AM IGMAR THOMAS' REVIVE BIG BAND PRESENTED BY REVIVE MUSIC "We're carrying on within the tradition of big bands, what would be relevant today- modifying the message, and making it translatable and accessible to the people, so that they have something to connect to. We represent that bridge." -Igmar Thomas

Heralded by the Village Voice for having New York City's "most electrifying young lions in jazz," Revive Big Band has a finger on the pulse of today's emerging progressive sound while pointing to things yet to come for a new era of music. Formed in 2010 by trumpeter, composer and arranger Igmar Thomas, this multi-generational ensemble knows no limits in seeking to advance, celebrate and re-imagine sonic freedom in big band form.



Featuring a world-class cadre of musicians who have consistently bridged the divides between art forms such as trombonist Ku-umba Frank Lacy, critically acclaimed pianist Marc Cary, Thelonious Monk Competition winner Ben Williams, Revive/Blue Note recording artist drummer Otis Brown III and saxophonist Marcus Strickland, the Revive Big Band is more than just a big band; it is a movement. The Revive Big Band symbolizes the voice of a new generation of musicians and audiences that hunger for a more expansive notion of jazz- one that exists in real time, reflecting a dynamic synthesis of their influences and experiences all while leaning towards the future.



Making its debut in 2010 at George Wein's CareFusion Jazz Festival, the Big Band has gone on to perform at The Kennedy Center, Central Park SummerStage, Harlem Stage, BRIC, the Apollo Theater, Highline Ballroom, Blue Note Jazz Club, Winter JazzFest, Art of Cool Festival and Ginny's Supper Club. In addition, it has had a series of extraordinary collaborations with artists including Gregory Porter, Bilal, Terence Blanchard, Sean Jones, Oliver Lake, Dr. Lonnie Smith, Pharoahe Monch, Talib Kweli, Nicholas Payton, Savion Glover, Robert Glasper and Jean Baylor.



The Revive Big Band's well-honed musical sensibilities powerfully synthesize the art of the beat, treatment of melody, reverence of the standard, and nuances of sound and time. It expands the contemporary canon of composition and dwells at the crossroads of jazz, hip hop, soul and beyond. The band's repertoire features original compositions and inventive orchestrations of jazz standards and contemporary classics by artists ranging from Oliver Nelson, Wayne Shorter and Freddie Hubbard to A Tribe Called Quest, J Dilla, Gangstarr, Bilal and more, in rare live performances.

Igmar Thomas *
Igmar Thomas @ Facebook *
Igmar Thomas @ Instagram *
Aug-18-18 08:00 PM KYLE EASTWOOD In the 17 years since the release of From There To Here, Kyle Eastwood's first album as a leader, the multi-talented double bassist, composer and producer has forged a dynamic musical path. His artistry is eclectic, yet refined and transcends the boundaries of jazz by exploring an ever-widening range of musical influences. While continuing to develop his parallel career as a composer and arranger on his legendary father Clint's Oscar nominated films "Mystic River," "Million Dollar Baby" and "Letters from Iwo Jima," Eastwood has reaffirmed traditions while creating truly contemporary, lyrical and melodic jazz. He has flirted with electro-jazz cool on Paris Blue (2004); delved into 70s-tinged "smooth jazz" accents and grooves on Now (2006); and gone "arty" urban chic on the subtly mixed Metropolitan (2009).

Eastwood's latest release Time Pieces is all at once a fresh landmark in Eastwood's discography and a culmination of a recent reassessment of his personal and artistic aesthetic that began with the release of Songs From the Chateau in 2011. The new phase of his career has involved a powerfully swinging, yet eminently sensual quintet of young English musicians: starting with Andrew McCormack (piano), Quentin Collins (trumpet and flugelhorn) and now including Brandon Allen (tenor and soprano sax) and Ernesto Simpson (drums). Eastwood brilliantly confirmed this new creative foundation on The View From Here (2013), often giving the impression of connecting with jazz archetypes while focusing on the pure joy of group interaction.

Time Pieces is a rich extension of this ongoing "transition," a work infused with melodic elegance and a sustained sense of groove organized around the quintet's often-collective compositions. It also features a thoughtful and sensual reading of Herbie Hancock's "Dolphin Dance" and a dense, lightning fast romp through Horace Silver's "Blowin' The Blues Away" that reflect the bassist's passion for lyrical hard bop. The collection launches with the infectious, spirited and funky "Caipirinha." Following the Silver and Hancock re-imaginings, the band digs in with the lively and swinging "boogaloo" grooves of "Prosecco Smile," then eases into the seductive melancholy of "Vista" and the freewheeling high energy "Peace of Silver," fashioned as a tribute to the jazz piano legend who passed away during the recording of Time Pieces.

With its subtle marching beat and moody, sensual sway, "Incantation," finds a direct heart line to the lyricism of Wayne Shorter. Eastwood finds new expression for one of his memorable film scores, "Letters From Iwo Jima," which he follows with the hypnotic, meditative "Nostalgique" and the feisty, hard- swinging bebop explosion "Bullet Train." Time Pieces wraps with the fun and freewheeling visit to the "Corner of 3rd and 6th Avenue," while the album's limited edition, four side LP version includes the gently bluesy, easy rolling Miles Davis tune "Pfrancing (No Blues)." The Miles track features a different American based ensemble: pianist Richard Germanson, trumpeter Alex Norris, tenor saxman Jason Rigby and drummer Joe Strasser.
"What I wanted to do in this record is pay my debt to jazz in the late 50s and early 60s, says Eastwood. "It was this lyrical hard bop, full of groove and sophisticated harmonies, exemplified by Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers when Lee Morgan and Wayne Shorter were in the group, Horace Silver's Blue Note recordings and different quintets Miles had throughout the 60s. It's the music that I like and that has never ceased to fascinate me since I discovered it as a teenager. What was amazing at the time was how all these groups had an immediately identifiable sound signature. I wondered where this singularity emerged from and I concluded that this was primarily the result of a collective work in the long run. It is this way of thinking and music making that I sought to reconnect with on this new album."

Although Eastwood was deeply inspired by the sounds and group aesthetic of that rarefied time in jazz history, Time Pieces is a mature work that doesn't borrow forms of the past superficially. Instead, it constantly manages to find a powerful balance between the more assertive hard bop at the turn of the 60s (in its relationship to the blues and in its orchestral potential) and a resolutely contemporary way to interpret this tradition. The bassist and his band bring their unique individual and collective experiences to the project, collectively drawing on the history of popular music and jazz to create a rich, diverse and contemporary experience that taps into everything from pop and rock to electro and the many forms of African-American music.

"This great ensemble I'm working with is designed like a true musical collective," Eastwood adds. "I brought to the writing and recording sessions pieces of melodies and chord progressions, but most often the songs and their arrangements were crystallized in the studio during rehearsals. The association that I have with pianist Andrew McCormack and trumpeter Quentin Collins extends back almost 10 years now. It is a luxury to be able to develop a project on a long-term basis. That longevity is obviously reflected in the music we create. But if we're the heart and soul of this quintet, the newer musicians' ability to fit into our flow was equally important. Brandon Allen on saxophones and Ernesto Simpson on drums have truly enriched this album by opening our core sound to fresh and exciting new horizons."
Aug-18-18 10:30 PM KYLE EASTWOOD In the 17 years since the release of From There To Here, Kyle Eastwood's first album as a leader, the multi-talented double bassist, composer and producer has forged a dynamic musical path. His artistry is eclectic, yet refined and transcends the boundaries of jazz by exploring an ever-widening range of musical influences. While continuing to develop his parallel career as a composer and arranger on his legendary father Clint's Oscar nominated films "Mystic River," "Million Dollar Baby" and "Letters from Iwo Jima," Eastwood has reaffirmed traditions while creating truly contemporary, lyrical and melodic jazz. He has flirted with electro-jazz cool on Paris Blue (2004); delved into 70s-tinged "smooth jazz" accents and grooves on Now (2006); and gone "arty" urban chic on the subtly mixed Metropolitan (2009).

Eastwood's latest release Time Pieces is all at once a fresh landmark in Eastwood's discography and a culmination of a recent reassessment of his personal and artistic aesthetic that began with the release of Songs From the Chateau in 2011. The new phase of his career has involved a powerfully swinging, yet eminently sensual quintet of young English musicians: starting with Andrew McCormack (piano), Quentin Collins (trumpet and flugelhorn) and now including Brandon Allen (tenor and soprano sax) and Ernesto Simpson (drums). Eastwood brilliantly confirmed this new creative foundation on The View From Here (2013), often giving the impression of connecting with jazz archetypes while focusing on the pure joy of group interaction.

Time Pieces is a rich extension of this ongoing "transition," a work infused with melodic elegance and a sustained sense of groove organized around the quintet's often-collective compositions. It also features a thoughtful and sensual reading of Herbie Hancock's "Dolphin Dance" and a dense, lightning fast romp through Horace Silver's "Blowin' The Blues Away" that reflect the bassist's passion for lyrical hard bop. The collection launches with the infectious, spirited and funky "Caipirinha." Following the Silver and Hancock re-imaginings, the band digs in with the lively and swinging "boogaloo" grooves of "Prosecco Smile," then eases into the seductive melancholy of "Vista" and the freewheeling high energy "Peace of Silver," fashioned as a tribute to the jazz piano legend who passed away during the recording of Time Pieces.

With its subtle marching beat and moody, sensual sway, "Incantation," finds a direct heart line to the lyricism of Wayne Shorter. Eastwood finds new expression for one of his memorable film scores, "Letters From Iwo Jima," which he follows with the hypnotic, meditative "Nostalgique" and the feisty, hard- swinging bebop explosion "Bullet Train." Time Pieces wraps with the fun and freewheeling visit to the "Corner of 3rd and 6th Avenue," while the album's limited edition, four side LP version includes the gently bluesy, easy rolling Miles Davis tune "Pfrancing (No Blues)." The Miles track features a different American based ensemble: pianist Richard Germanson, trumpeter Alex Norris, tenor saxman Jason Rigby and drummer Joe Strasser.
"What I wanted to do in this record is pay my debt to jazz in the late 50s and early 60s, says Eastwood. "It was this lyrical hard bop, full of groove and sophisticated harmonies, exemplified by Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers when Lee Morgan and Wayne Shorter were in the group, Horace Silver's Blue Note recordings and different quintets Miles had throughout the 60s. It's the music that I like and that has never ceased to fascinate me since I discovered it as a teenager. What was amazing at the time was how all these groups had an immediately identifiable sound signature. I wondered where this singularity emerged from and I concluded that this was primarily the result of a collective work in the long run. It is this way of thinking and music making that I sought to reconnect with on this new album."

Although Eastwood was deeply inspired by the sounds and group aesthetic of that rarefied time in jazz history, Time Pieces is a mature work that doesn't borrow forms of the past superficially. Instead, it constantly manages to find a powerful balance between the more assertive hard bop at the turn of the 60s (in its relationship to the blues and in its orchestral potential) and a resolutely contemporary way to interpret this tradition. The bassist and his band bring their unique individual and collective experiences to the project, collectively drawing on the history of popular music and jazz to create a rich, diverse and contemporary experience that taps into everything from pop and rock to electro and the many forms of African-American music.

"This great ensemble I'm working with is designed like a true musical collective," Eastwood adds. "I brought to the writing and recording sessions pieces of melodies and chord progressions, but most often the songs and their arrangements were crystallized in the studio during rehearsals. The association that I have with pianist Andrew McCormack and trumpeter Quentin Collins extends back almost 10 years now. It is a luxury to be able to develop a project on a long-term basis. That longevity is obviously reflected in the music we create. But if we're the heart and soul of this quintet, the newer musicians' ability to fit into our flow was equally important. Brandon Allen on saxophones and Ernesto Simpson on drums have truly enriched this album by opening our core sound to fresh and exciting new horizons."
Aug-19-18 08:00 PM KYLE EASTWOOD In the 17 years since the release of From There To Here, Kyle Eastwood's first album as a leader, the multi-talented double bassist, composer and producer has forged a dynamic musical path. His artistry is eclectic, yet refined and transcends the boundaries of jazz by exploring an ever-widening range of musical influences. While continuing to develop his parallel career as a composer and arranger on his legendary father Clint's Oscar nominated films "Mystic River," "Million Dollar Baby" and "Letters from Iwo Jima," Eastwood has reaffirmed traditions while creating truly contemporary, lyrical and melodic jazz. He has flirted with electro-jazz cool on Paris Blue (2004); delved into 70s-tinged "smooth jazz" accents and grooves on Now (2006); and gone "arty" urban chic on the subtly mixed Metropolitan (2009).

Eastwood's latest release Time Pieces is all at once a fresh landmark in Eastwood's discography and a culmination of a recent reassessment of his personal and artistic aesthetic that began with the release of Songs From the Chateau in 2011. The new phase of his career has involved a powerfully swinging, yet eminently sensual quintet of young English musicians: starting with Andrew McCormack (piano), Quentin Collins (trumpet and flugelhorn) and now including Brandon Allen (tenor and soprano sax) and Ernesto Simpson (drums). Eastwood brilliantly confirmed this new creative foundation on The View From Here (2013), often giving the impression of connecting with jazz archetypes while focusing on the pure joy of group interaction.

Time Pieces is a rich extension of this ongoing "transition," a work infused with melodic elegance and a sustained sense of groove organized around the quintet's often-collective compositions. It also features a thoughtful and sensual reading of Herbie Hancock's "Dolphin Dance" and a dense, lightning fast romp through Horace Silver's "Blowin' The Blues Away" that reflect the bassist's passion for lyrical hard bop. The collection launches with the infectious, spirited and funky "Caipirinha." Following the Silver and Hancock re-imaginings, the band digs in with the lively and swinging "boogaloo" grooves of "Prosecco Smile," then eases into the seductive melancholy of "Vista" and the freewheeling high energy "Peace of Silver," fashioned as a tribute to the jazz piano legend who passed away during the recording of Time Pieces.

With its subtle marching beat and moody, sensual sway, "Incantation," finds a direct heart line to the lyricism of Wayne Shorter. Eastwood finds new expression for one of his memorable film scores, "Letters From Iwo Jima," which he follows with the hypnotic, meditative "Nostalgique" and the feisty, hard- swinging bebop explosion "Bullet Train." Time Pieces wraps with the fun and freewheeling visit to the "Corner of 3rd and 6th Avenue," while the album's limited edition, four side LP version includes the gently bluesy, easy rolling Miles Davis tune "Pfrancing (No Blues)." The Miles track features a different American based ensemble: pianist Richard Germanson, trumpeter Alex Norris, tenor saxman Jason Rigby and drummer Joe Strasser.
"What I wanted to do in this record is pay my debt to jazz in the late 50s and early 60s, says Eastwood. "It was this lyrical hard bop, full of groove and sophisticated harmonies, exemplified by Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers when Lee Morgan and Wayne Shorter were in the group, Horace Silver's Blue Note recordings and different quintets Miles had throughout the 60s. It's the music that I like and that has never ceased to fascinate me since I discovered it as a teenager. What was amazing at the time was how all these groups had an immediately identifiable sound signature. I wondered where this singularity emerged from and I concluded that this was primarily the result of a collective work in the long run. It is this way of thinking and music making that I sought to reconnect with on this new album."

Although Eastwood was deeply inspired by the sounds and group aesthetic of that rarefied time in jazz history, Time Pieces is a mature work that doesn't borrow forms of the past superficially. Instead, it constantly manages to find a powerful balance between the more assertive hard bop at the turn of the 60s (in its relationship to the blues and in its orchestral potential) and a resolutely contemporary way to interpret this tradition. The bassist and his band bring their unique individual and collective experiences to the project, collectively drawing on the history of popular music and jazz to create a rich, diverse and contemporary experience that taps into everything from pop and rock to electro and the many forms of African-American music.

"This great ensemble I'm working with is designed like a true musical collective," Eastwood adds. "I brought to the writing and recording sessions pieces of melodies and chord progressions, but most often the songs and their arrangements were crystallized in the studio during rehearsals. The association that I have with pianist Andrew McCormack and trumpeter Quentin Collins extends back almost 10 years now. It is a luxury to be able to develop a project on a long-term basis. That longevity is obviously reflected in the music we create. But if we're the heart and soul of this quintet, the newer musicians' ability to fit into our flow was equally important. Brandon Allen on saxophones and Ernesto Simpson on drums have truly enriched this album by opening our core sound to fresh and exciting new horizons."
Aug-19-18 10:30 PM KYLE EASTWOOD In the 17 years since the release of From There To Here, Kyle Eastwood's first album as a leader, the multi-talented double bassist, composer and producer has forged a dynamic musical path. His artistry is eclectic, yet refined and transcends the boundaries of jazz by exploring an ever-widening range of musical influences. While continuing to develop his parallel career as a composer and arranger on his legendary father Clint's Oscar nominated films "Mystic River," "Million Dollar Baby" and "Letters from Iwo Jima," Eastwood has reaffirmed traditions while creating truly contemporary, lyrical and melodic jazz. He has flirted with electro-jazz cool on Paris Blue (2004); delved into 70s-tinged "smooth jazz" accents and grooves on Now (2006); and gone "arty" urban chic on the subtly mixed Metropolitan (2009).

Eastwood's latest release Time Pieces is all at once a fresh landmark in Eastwood's discography and a culmination of a recent reassessment of his personal and artistic aesthetic that began with the release of Songs From the Chateau in 2011. The new phase of his career has involved a powerfully swinging, yet eminently sensual quintet of young English musicians: starting with Andrew McCormack (piano), Quentin Collins (trumpet and flugelhorn) and now including Brandon Allen (tenor and soprano sax) and Ernesto Simpson (drums). Eastwood brilliantly confirmed this new creative foundation on The View From Here (2013), often giving the impression of connecting with jazz archetypes while focusing on the pure joy of group interaction.

Time Pieces is a rich extension of this ongoing "transition," a work infused with melodic elegance and a sustained sense of groove organized around the quintet's often-collective compositions. It also features a thoughtful and sensual reading of Herbie Hancock's "Dolphin Dance" and a dense, lightning fast romp through Horace Silver's "Blowin' The Blues Away" that reflect the bassist's passion for lyrical hard bop. The collection launches with the infectious, spirited and funky "Caipirinha." Following the Silver and Hancock re-imaginings, the band digs in with the lively and swinging "boogaloo" grooves of "Prosecco Smile," then eases into the seductive melancholy of "Vista" and the freewheeling high energy "Peace of Silver," fashioned as a tribute to the jazz piano legend who passed away during the recording of Time Pieces.

With its subtle marching beat and moody, sensual sway, "Incantation," finds a direct heart line to the lyricism of Wayne Shorter. Eastwood finds new expression for one of his memorable film scores, "Letters From Iwo Jima," which he follows with the hypnotic, meditative "Nostalgique" and the feisty, hard- swinging bebop explosion "Bullet Train." Time Pieces wraps with the fun and freewheeling visit to the "Corner of 3rd and 6th Avenue," while the album's limited edition, four side LP version includes the gently bluesy, easy rolling Miles Davis tune "Pfrancing (No Blues)." The Miles track features a different American based ensemble: pianist Richard Germanson, trumpeter Alex Norris, tenor saxman Jason Rigby and drummer Joe Strasser.
"What I wanted to do in this record is pay my debt to jazz in the late 50s and early 60s, says Eastwood. "It was this lyrical hard bop, full of groove and sophisticated harmonies, exemplified by Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers when Lee Morgan and Wayne Shorter were in the group, Horace Silver's Blue Note recordings and different quintets Miles had throughout the 60s. It's the music that I like and that has never ceased to fascinate me since I discovered it as a teenager. What was amazing at the time was how all these groups had an immediately identifiable sound signature. I wondered where this singularity emerged from and I concluded that this was primarily the result of a collective work in the long run. It is this way of thinking and music making that I sought to reconnect with on this new album."

Although Eastwood was deeply inspired by the sounds and group aesthetic of that rarefied time in jazz history, Time Pieces is a mature work that doesn't borrow forms of the past superficially. Instead, it constantly manages to find a powerful balance between the more assertive hard bop at the turn of the 60s (in its relationship to the blues and in its orchestral potential) and a resolutely contemporary way to interpret this tradition. The bassist and his band bring their unique individual and collective experiences to the project, collectively drawing on the history of popular music and jazz to create a rich, diverse and contemporary experience that taps into everything from pop and rock to electro and the many forms of African-American music.

"This great ensemble I'm working with is designed like a true musical collective," Eastwood adds. "I brought to the writing and recording sessions pieces of melodies and chord progressions, but most often the songs and their arrangements were crystallized in the studio during rehearsals. The association that I have with pianist Andrew McCormack and trumpeter Quentin Collins extends back almost 10 years now. It is a luxury to be able to develop a project on a long-term basis. That longevity is obviously reflected in the music we create. But if we're the heart and soul of this quintet, the newer musicians' ability to fit into our flow was equally important. Brandon Allen on saxophones and Ernesto Simpson on drums have truly enriched this album by opening our core sound to fresh and exciting new horizons."
Aug-20-18 08:00 PM CHRISTIAN SCOTT ATUNDE ADJUAH Christian Scott, also known as Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah (born March 31, 1983, in New Orleans, Louisiana) is a two-time Edison Award winning and Grammy Award nominated trumpeter, composer and producer. He is the nephew of jazz innovator and legendary sax man, Donald Harrison, Jr. His musical tutelage began under the direction of his uncle at the age of thirteen. After graduating from the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts (NOCCA) in 2001, Christian received a full tuition scholarship to Berklee College of Music where he earned a degree in professional music and film scoring thirty months later.

Since 2002, Christian has released eleven critically acclaimed studio recordings, two live albums and one greatest hits collection. According to NPR, "Christian Scott ushers in new era of jazz". He has been heralded by JazzTimes Magazine as "Jazz's young style God." Christian is known for developing the harmonic convention known as the "forecasting cell" and for his use of an un-voiced tone in his playing, emphasizing breath over vibration at the mouthpiece. The technique is known as his "whisper technique."



Christian is the progenitor of "Stretch Music," a jazz rooted, genre blind musical form that attempts to "stretch" jazz's rhythmic, melodic and harmonic conventions to encompass as many other musical forms, languages and cultures as possible. Jazz is a progressive musical movement and Christian is at the forefront of its continued viability as an art form. Christian's 2015 release, Stretch Music, marked the partnership between Christian's Stretch Music record label and Ropeadope Records. Critics and fans alike have praised the recording. Stretch Music is also the first recording to have an accompanying app, for which Christian won the prestigious JazzFM Innovator of the year Award in 2016. The Stretch Music App is an interactive music player that allows musicians the ability to completely control their practicing, listening and learning experience by customizing the player to fit their specific needs and goals.

In 2017, Christian released three albums, collectively titled The Centennial Trilogy, that debuted at number one on iTunes. The albums' launch commemorated the 100th anniversary of the first Jazz recordings of 1917. The series is, at its core, a sobering re-evaluation of the social political realities of the world through sound. It speaks to a litany of issues that continue to plague the collective human experience, such as slavery in America via the Prison Industrial Complex, food insecurity, xenophobia, immigration, climate change, sexual orientation and gender inequality, fascism and the return of the demagogue.

Christian is a scion of New Orleans' first family of art and culture, the Harrisons, and the grandson of legendary Big Chief, Donald Harrison Sr., who lead four nations in the City's masking tradition. The HBO series, Treme, borrowed the name "Guardians of the Flame" from African-American cultural group Scott began "masking" as a member of with his grandfather in 1989. Christian recently became the Chief of The Brave, in February 2017, one his grandfather's early banners. In 2018, Tulane University's acclaimed Amistad Research Center announced its archive of the Donald Harrison, Sr. legacy papers to highlight the Harrison/Scott/Nelson family's contributions to the arts, activism, and African diaspora cultural expressions. The Harrison family's story has been documented by Oscar winning director, the late Jonathan Demme, in his post-Hurricane Katrina works.

Christian is dedicated to a number of causes that positively impact communities. He gives his time and talents in service to several organizations which garnered him a place in Ebony Magazine's 30 Young Leaders Under 30. He has provided his services to Each One, Save One, NO/AIDS Task Force, Girls First, The Mardi Gras Indian Hall of Fame, Good Work Network and numerous other community service organizations. Holding master classes, creating and participating in discussion panels, and purchasing and giving away instruments, are all part of Christian's community based work. He has worked with Guardians Institute in New Orleans' 9th Ward, which is dedicated to reading and fiscal literacy, cultural retention and a firm commitment to the participation of community elders and artists in uplifting and supporting youths in underserved areas of New Orleans. Christian currently sits on the Boards of Guardians Institute and The NOCCA Institute. Since Christian's emergence on the jazz music scene, he has been a passionate and vocal proponent of human rights and an unflinching critic of injustices throughout the world.

Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah *
Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah @ Facebook *
Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah @ Twitter *
Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah @ Instagram *
Aug-20-18 10:30 PM CHRISTIAN SCOTT ATUNDE ADJUAH Christian Scott, also known as Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah (born March 31, 1983, in New Orleans, Louisiana) is a two-time Edison Award winning and Grammy Award nominated trumpeter, composer and producer. He is the nephew of jazz innovator and legendary sax man, Donald Harrison, Jr. His musical tutelage began under the direction of his uncle at the age of thirteen. After graduating from the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts (NOCCA) in 2001, Christian received a full tuition scholarship to Berklee College of Music where he earned a degree in professional music and film scoring thirty months later.

Since 2002, Christian has released eleven critically acclaimed studio recordings, two live albums and one greatest hits collection. According to NPR, "Christian Scott ushers in new era of jazz". He has been heralded by JazzTimes Magazine as "Jazz's young style God." Christian is known for developing the harmonic convention known as the "forecasting cell" and for his use of an un-voiced tone in his playing, emphasizing breath over vibration at the mouthpiece. The technique is known as his "whisper technique."



Christian is the progenitor of "Stretch Music," a jazz rooted, genre blind musical form that attempts to "stretch" jazz's rhythmic, melodic and harmonic conventions to encompass as many other musical forms, languages and cultures as possible. Jazz is a progressive musical movement and Christian is at the forefront of its continued viability as an art form. Christian's 2015 release, Stretch Music, marked the partnership between Christian's Stretch Music record label and Ropeadope Records. Critics and fans alike have praised the recording. Stretch Music is also the first recording to have an accompanying app, for which Christian won the prestigious JazzFM Innovator of the year Award in 2016. The Stretch Music App is an interactive music player that allows musicians the ability to completely control their practicing, listening and learning experience by customizing the player to fit their specific needs and goals.

In 2017, Christian released three albums, collectively titled The Centennial Trilogy, that debuted at number one on iTunes. The albums' launch commemorated the 100th anniversary of the first Jazz recordings of 1917. The series is, at its core, a sobering re-evaluation of the social political realities of the world through sound. It speaks to a litany of issues that continue to plague the collective human experience, such as slavery in America via the Prison Industrial Complex, food insecurity, xenophobia, immigration, climate change, sexual orientation and gender inequality, fascism and the return of the demagogue.

Christian is a scion of New Orleans' first family of art and culture, the Harrisons, and the grandson of legendary Big Chief, Donald Harrison Sr., who lead four nations in the City's masking tradition. The HBO series, Treme, borrowed the name "Guardians of the Flame" from African-American cultural group Scott began "masking" as a member of with his grandfather in 1989. Christian recently became the Chief of The Brave, in February 2017, one his grandfather's early banners. In 2018, Tulane University's acclaimed Amistad Research Center announced its archive of the Donald Harrison, Sr. legacy papers to highlight the Harrison/Scott/Nelson family's contributions to the arts, activism, and African diaspora cultural expressions. The Harrison family's story has been documented by Oscar winning director, the late Jonathan Demme, in his post-Hurricane Katrina works.

Christian is dedicated to a number of causes that positively impact communities. He gives his time and talents in service to several organizations which garnered him a place in Ebony Magazine's 30 Young Leaders Under 30. He has provided his services to Each One, Save One, NO/AIDS Task Force, Girls First, The Mardi Gras Indian Hall of Fame, Good Work Network and numerous other community service organizations. Holding master classes, creating and participating in discussion panels, and purchasing and giving away instruments, are all part of Christian's community based work. He has worked with Guardians Institute in New Orleans' 9th Ward, which is dedicated to reading and fiscal literacy, cultural retention and a firm commitment to the participation of community elders and artists in uplifting and supporting youths in underserved areas of New Orleans. Christian currently sits on the Boards of Guardians Institute and The NOCCA Institute. Since Christian's emergence on the jazz music scene, he has been a passionate and vocal proponent of human rights and an unflinching critic of injustices throughout the world.

Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah *
Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah @ Facebook *
Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah @ Twitter *
Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah @ Instagram *