Webtunes



<-- Venues

  Museum of Modern Art
URL
Address: 11 West 53 Street
City: New York
State: NY
Date Time Event Description
Nov-13-17 12:00 AM Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989 Drawn primarily from MoMA's collection, Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989 brings artworks produced using computers and computational thinking together with notable examples of computer and component design. The exhibition reveals how artists, architects, and designers operating at the vanguard of art and technology deployed computing as a means to reconsider artistic production. The artists featured in Thinking Machines exploited the potential of emerging technologies by inventing systems wholesale or by partnering with institutions and corporations that provided access to cutting-edge machines. They channeled the promise of computing into kinetic sculpture, plotter drawing, computer animation, and video installation. Photographers and architects likewise recognized these technologies' capacity to reconfigure human communities and the built environment.
Jan-19-18 01:00 PM Duel in the Sun

Duel in the Sun

1946. USA. Directed by King Vidor. When her father is hanged for the murder of her mother and her mother’s lover, Pearl Chavez goes to live with distant relatives in Texas. Pearl is welcomed by Laura Belle and her older, kindhearted son Jesse. However, Laura Belle’s husband, Senator McCanles, takes an immediate disliking to Pearl, while his younger, lusty son Lewt finds her very desirable indeed. 135 min.

Jan-19-18 04:30 PM The World and the Woman and more

The World and the Woman

1916. USA. Directed by Eugene Moore. Broadway legend Jeanne Eagels stars as a prostitute who discovers she has faith-healing gifts in a rare silent feature from the New York–based Thanhouser Film Corp. Restored by the George Eastman Museum. Live musical accompaniment by Donald Sosin. 74 min.

Now We’re in the Air (excerpt)

1927. USA. Directed by Frank R. Strayer. Louise Brooks makes a brief but memorable appearance as a carnival performer in this newly discovered fragment of a World War I aviation comedy. Restored by The Library of Congress in collaboration with the San Francisco Silent Film Festival. 23 min.

Jan-19-18 04:45 PM OK Today Tomorrow

OK Today Tomorrow

1983. USA. Directed by Harald Vogl. Arriving in the US with a background in abstract art, opera, and film—including work with German director Werner Schroeter—Vogl began making Super8 films in New York that stripped away the stylistic markers of Hollywood, New Wave cinema of the 1960s and ’70s, and classic avant-garde film, leaving only traces of their generic conventions. For the first hour of OK Today Tomorrow, he stages a series of fraught encounters around the city between four gentrified New Yorkers before abandoning his vague narrative of youthful angst altogether in favor of documenting the urban landscape itself. The dusk-to-dawn “city symphony” that ends the film resembles similar Super8 social studies by Vogl’s uptown contemporary John Ahearn; both recorded the daily lives of working-class black and immigrant communities on the streets of a city on the verge of the corporate takeover and sweeping gentrification that followed in the 1980s and ’90s. Preserved by The Museum of Modern Art, New York. 93 min.

Jan-19-18 07:00 PM The Banishment

The Banishment

2007. Russia. Directed by Andrey Zvyagintsev. Shot in nondescript European locations, The Banishment conjures a permanent sense of isolation and displacement—both physical and psychological. Zvyagintsev’s follow-up to his debut feature, The Return, once again focuses on a father figure, played by The Return’s Konstantin Lavronenko in a Cannes Best Actor Award–winning performance. A man with many secrets, he suddenly moves his family to the countryside. Just as the children begin to adjust to a new life, their world unravels when their mother, played with melancholic resignation by Norwegian-Swedish actress Maria Bonnevie, makes an unexpected announcement. A touch of film noir accompanies this elusive, steadily paced exploration of the mysteries of the human heart. 157 min.

Jan-19-18 07:15 PM The Three Musketeers

The Three Musketeers

1921. USA. Directed by Fred Niblo. Douglas Fairbanks stars in perhaps his definitive role (and certainly his favorite): the swashbuckling d’Artagnan of the Alexandre Dumas novel, here surrounded by the lavish production values only silent epics could offer. This is a major new restoration created in collaboration with the San Francisco Silent Film Festival and based on the original elements that Fairbanks donated to MoMA in 1939, shortly before his death. Music arranged by Donald Sosin and performed by The Four MoMAteers (Donald Sosin, keyboard; Alicia Svigals, violin; Allison Miller, drums; Ron Wasserman, bass). 136 min.

Jan-20-18 12:00 PM Un-walling Citizenship

Led by Teddy Cruz, architect and Professor of Public Culture and Urbanism, Visual Arts Department, University of California, San Diego; and Fonna Forman, Founding Director, UCSD Center on Global Justice, this half-day workshop focuses on the idea of the border zone as a site of artistic and political creativity. Participants will investigate the US-Mexico border as a geography of interdependence and coexistence, oriented less by jurisdictional and territorial terms and policies, and more around the shared practices, norms, interests, and aspirations that characterize everyday life in a border region.

In addition to a moderated discussion around this timely topic and a visit to MoMA's Architecture and Design study center to view relevant works in the collection, the workshop will involve developing diagrams and other visualizations to highlight zones of urban conflict as important laboratories for rethinking citizenship in more inclusive ways, reoriented as a cultural and practical concept. This program will provoke participants to develop new political languages through which to visualize hidden assets and opportunities in border regions that divide nations as well as cities.

Tickets for this program will be available beginning December 29. Tickets are $30 and can be purchased online, at the information desk, or at the Film desk in advance of the program.

Schedule

12 pm: Introductory Presentation by Teddy Cruz and Fonna Forman
12:30 pm: Visit to Architecture and Design Study Center
2:00 pm: Workshop
3:45–4:30 pm: Closing Reception

Jan-20-18 01:00 PM Eight Hours Don’t Make A Day

Eight Hours Don’t Make A Day

1972. West Germany. Written and directed by Rainer Werner Fassbinder. A social and political history of West Germany is portrayed through the struggles of three generations of toolmakers in this epic, five-part television series written and directed by Rainer Werner Fassbinder. This is the first US screening of the new digital restoration from the 16mm reversal positive, digitized and restored by ARRI, under the artistic direction of Juliane Maria Lorenz of the Rainer Werner Fassbinder. Funded with the kind support by MoMA, FFA, Film und Medien Stiftung NRW ARRI Media, RWFF, RWF Werkschau, and Verlag der Autoren. Courtesy of Janus Films. In German; English subtitles. 478 min.

Jan-20-18 04:00 PM Cobra Woman

Cobra Woman

1944. USA. Directed by Robert Siodmak. Having inspired Jack Smith, Charles Ludlam, Gore Vidal, and Mart Crowley, it only made sense that 1944’s Cobra Woman would get a screening at Club 57 on July 24, 1980. This Maria Montez movie, directed by Robert Siodmak, whose specialty was usually film noir, is one of the epitomes of 1940s Hollywood bizarreness. Like its Twentieth Century-Fox equal, The Gang’s All Here, it’s so supremely escapist that it becomes surreal. And surrealism was the underlying basis of Club 57. Maria plays twins, good and bad, on a fabulous tropical island. And one twin must win! It’s 1940s USA fluff, so you can guess which one wins, but the bad one has the best costumes and the ferocious cobra dance! And all in vivid, old-school, three-strip Technicolor that really is luscious. Let’s hope it will be converted into 3-D someday! Siodmak would, two years later, make his good-twin-bad-twin film noir The Dark Mirror with Olivia De Havilland. From American Directors: Volume 1 by Jean-Pierre Coursodon: ‘Cobra Woman…despite its utter silliness, may have been of more than routine interest to [Siodmak].’” (film notes by John Epperson). 71 min.

Jan-20-18 04:30 PM The Banishment

The Banishment

2007. Russia. Directed by Andrey Zvyagintsev. Shot in nondescript European locations, The Banishment conjures a permanent sense of isolation and displacement—both physical and psychological. Zvyagintsev’s follow-up to his debut feature, The Return, once again focuses on a father figure, played by The Return’s Konstantin Lavronenko in a Cannes Best Actor Award–winning performance. A man with many secrets, he suddenly moves his family to the countryside. Just as the children begin to adjust to a new life, their world unravels when their mother, played with melancholic resignation by Norwegian-Swedish actress Maria Bonnevie, makes an unexpected announcement. A touch of film noir accompanies this elusive, steadily paced exploration of the mysteries of the human heart. 157 min.